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The vessel is not recorded in the 1882/83 edition, the next that I have, at least not as Thomas Wood, though it is quite possible that it was still listed there under another name had 'V. Per 1 (Board of Trade inquiry into the 1875 wreck, ex 'Accounts and Papers', published 1876, a 'Google' book).

That edition is the last Lloyd's Register record of the vessel that I have available. In subsequent years the vessel would seem to have served South America out of the ports of Liverpool & Swansea also.

The boats were ordered out & a gig with all the ship's papers was swamped & lost.

22, 1875, the vessel struck three times on a reef to the westward of Dog Island, maybe at West Cay. The pumps were manned but the vessel had 2 feet of water 'in the well' which rapidly became 6 feet.

Another site page offers literature published by 'Austin', photographs etc. They surely will now need further revision to incorporate data published in 'A & P News', the employee magazine of Austin & Pickersgill Limited, specifically in issue No. Alan Vickers has kindly provided scans of two pages from that issue, a two-page spread about the history of the collective 'Austin', derived from the manuscripts of James W. The reference to 'Mills' is apparently to George and John Mills. The 'old slipway', which I presume means the one built in 1846, 'together with rails, cogs, cods, and cradles was taken up and shipped to a buyer in Helsingfors'. Re-registered in 1919 as a lighter by 'Victorian Lighterage Pty.

AUSTIN LTD.(1826/1954 - originally founded in 1826, in 1954 became a part of 'Austin & Pickersgill Limited.')Can you help with the history of this company? A part at least of that history would surely be contained in a small 1954 volume of oblong format, published by 'S. Austin & Son, Ltd.' (as per the cover of the volume) or maybe by 'S. A copy of the volume was sold via e Bay for GBP 40.00, in early Sep. The paragraphs that follow have been revised & re-revised over the years as new data has been located. It would seem that there were major changes in 1869 & in the following years as the yard was extended again & again as wooden shipbuilding came to an end & iron shipbuilding became the norm. In 1888, the vessel was hulked (which is this case means converted to a lighter), at Melbourne, & became 243 tons only. Name changed to Birchgrove - earlier than 1910, but was it truly so? Nicholas, of Ballarat (near Melbourne), as the then owner of the 219 ton Birch Grove.

The yard would seem to have been known as the 'Wear Dockyard'. It would be good to be able to provide on this page some images of the early members of the Austin family, from contemporary prints or from other sources. The 'pontoon' is under Westburn, the vessel at right, built in 1929. I understand it was a giant platform which essentially rested on the bed of the River Wear & could raise a vessel out of the water & lower it back down again. 'Imagine' calls it a 'submersible barge' in their page re 'Austin's Pontoon, Sunderland', which features a print (of unknown date) by Herbert William Simpson (1907-1972). I think that the main 'Austin' yard may have closed in early 1960 & the business was relocated to Pallion. Tom's father and mother are both in the launching party - his father 8th from the right & his mother 5th from the left. For service from Sunderland to the Mediterranean, with J. The ship was then abandoned & became a total wreck. The Court concluded that Beane had caused the loss of Mora by neglecting to verify the vessel's position by the frequent use of the lead.

The only image I have seen so far, related to the yard at all, is an image of Mr. Fireside, built in 1942, is beside her & Borde, built in 1953, is the ship in the near left rear. Can anybody advise re the origin of what is a truly fine image. The first image on this 'pdf' page (thanks City of Sunderland! Tom has provided launch images with everyone identified re 4 vessels (Ardingly, Borde, Hackney & Wallarah) & also another launching image with an 'identity' problem. Per 1 (Board of Trade inquiry into 1876 grounding & loss, ex 'Accounts and Papers', published 1876, a 'Google' book), 2 (ownership in 1858). The Court suspended his certificate for 3 months, but suggested he should be granted a mate's certificate.

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And in 1874/75 Lloyd's Register, the owner is recorded as being G.

Those words are from 2 1/2 pages about the yard in 'Where Ships Are Born'. If you can help me figure this all out, do please be in touch. Samuel Peter Austin may be the son of Peter Austin (2) (to be third generation) but if that is so it should have been 'P. 2009, though I understand that the dock gates, in considerable decay, were removed in the mid 1970s. Grice of Sunderland as the owner of the 543 ton vessel. I previously noted one voyage reference to Australia but there probably are many.

Anyway, in 1826 he changed occupations & started a ship repair facility on North Sands 'with a repair slipway up which the ships were hauled by capstans worked by horses'. The word 'graving' was used, but perhaps is no longer used, to refer to the cleaning of a ship's bottom, the term being derived, perhaps from a French word which meant 'beach'.) I am advised that that graving dock is still there today - in Jun. A Melbourne, Australia, ship from 1871 it would seem but LR of 1876/77 first mentions the registry at Melbourne of the vessel now (LR') of 543 tons. Grice of Melbourne as her then owner - thru, per LR, 1883/84.

'Ritson & Co.' presumably later changed their name & by the 1876/77 register, 'F. At this point, I am unable to tell you what finally happened to her.

The vessel would seem to have traded initially to India & later to Japan. Nilsen' chosen to change the name of the vessel or had sold it.

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